blog

please donate twitter whitefacebook whiteinstagram whitepintrest white

NursingGeorgetown Tanning Infographic
Of all the risky behaviors that teens may engage in, indoor tanning is one that’s most directly related to preventable and potentially deadly skin cancers — namely, melanoma. That’s why it’s important for teens, their parents, and healthcare providers to have a clear understanding about the facts of teenage indoor tanning — and why the risks are particularly high for adolescents.

Indoor Tanning Trends Among Teens

Although indoor tanning rates are trending down among high school students, the prevalence is still dangerously high. According to the 2013 U.S. Youth Risk Behavior Survey,  just over 20 percent of female high school students used an indoor tanning device in 2013 and 10.3 percent did so frequently. Most commonly, these were non-Hispanic white females.  Among male students, just over five percent engaged in indoor tanning, and two percent tanned frequently.

To understand such trends, it’s important to know the motivation behind them. According to the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer, one central reason is the age-old symptom of youth: peer pressure. Social norms equate a tan with attractiveness and health. In addition, indoor tanning may actually be somewhat addictive — and researchers are currently evaluating if this is the case.

How Teen Habits Impact the Overall Rate of Indoor Tanning in the U.S.
The indoor tanning industry is definitely benefiting from the habits of teens — since it’s estimated that 2.3 million teens visit a tanning salon at least once a year. However, the increased evidence of risk has led to more regulations for the industry — with an ongoing call for even more.
Currently, 44 states and the District of Columbia have some kind of law or regulation in place that restricts indoor tanning for minors under a certain age — and evidence suggests that such restrictions are effective in reducing usage in this population.

The Risks of Indoor Tanning for Teens
Indoor tanning exposes users to two types of UV rays, UVA (tanning/aging and UVB (burning) — both of which damage skin and can cause various types of cancer. This is particularly the case for teens, who have a higher long-term risk for getting melanoma associated with indoor tanning behaviors — as well premature skin aging. Short-term risks include the potential for burns to the skin and eye damage if appropriate protection isn’t used.

How Can Parents and Providers Discourage Indoor Tanning?
In addition to the issues discussed previously, other factors which influence indoor tanning by teens include lack of awareness of the dangers involved, and the influence of the adults in their lives. Research has shown that parental acceptance of tanning has a strong influence on adolescent tanning behaviors, especially between mothers and adolescent daughters — so it’s important for parents to set good examples.
In addition, in order to increase awareness, primary care providers need to properly educate young patients and appropriate education about the dangers of indoor tanning to their young patients and their families — as well as regular screenings for skin cancer detection. If everyone involved is armed with the facts about teenage indoor tanning, a coordinated effort can be achieved to help discourage this high-risk behavior.

 This infographic was produced by Nursing@Georgetown, the online Master of Science in Nursing degree from Georgetown University's School of Nursing & Health Studies.

CONTACT US

1-781-875-1SPF (1773)

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

75 Washington Street

Norwell, MA 02061

EMAIL SIGNUP

Coming Soon

Logo MPF BeSunAWARE white